Author: Josh Ajima

Josh Ajima is a technology resource teacher at Dominion High School, a public high school, and the Loudoun Academy of Science, a magnet science program, in Sterling, Virginia, United States. He has advocated for grassroots adoption of maker based learning in the classroom. He has a particular interest in 3D printing for education and has served as a member of the Make magazine digital fabrication review team. In 2015, he helped establish a digital fabrication lab at the Loudoun Academy of Science. In 2016, he served as team lead for Dominion High School’s winning proposal for the US Department of Education’s CTE Makeover Challenge. Ajima holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Virginia.

How Do We Scale Up MakerEd?

What is the essential question that drives your work as a FabLearn Fellow? I spoke with Chief FabLearn Fellow Cat Herder, Sylvia Martinez, today. It was a mix of status report, pep talk and kick in the pants. In core maker educator mode, it doesn’t matter what the student has accomplished up to that point… Read more »

Mystery Artifact: Getting Started and Rubric

I’m working with Super Star Social Science educator Andrea Relator, @AndreaRelator, on a Mystery Artifact project. Over the last 2 days, we kicked off the project with 4 of her classes, taking approximately 45 minutes of class time. Students will be creating an artifact related to a specific president that illustrates the Constitutional powers of the… Read more »

Lesson Plan: MLK March on Washington Artifact

Introduction The 1960s Civil Rights Movement sought to end segregation and discrimination against African Americans. One of the largest political rallies of the Civil Rights Movement was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. A key moment of the march was the “I have a dream” speech delivered by Martin Luther King, Jr. from… Read more »

WIP 004: Getting Things Done

This week’s Work In Progress has a number of ideas for articles and designs that I managed to publish before uploading this post. The time from idea to product is getting shorter. I’m approaching publishing something every day or two which is a step up from my typical post every two weeks. Sylvia Martinez’s urgings to the… Read more »

Stuff for Cutting Cardboard

My daughter’s class is doing some sort of maker project and the teacher asked for students to bring in stacks of cardboard. To be helpful I grabbed a few shears from my personal makerspace and sent them in. The next day I was looking through a bin of odds and ends and ran into a… Read more »

What’s in Your Makerspace?

A common question I hear from fellow maker educators is, “What’s in your makerspace?” My school is one of 10 winners of the US Department of Education’s CTE Makeover Challenge so my answer is much different this year than last. In total, we won $50,000 in cash in prizes in addition to the existing hardware provided… Read more »

Giving a Makerspace

Today, my friend Nichole Thomas @MrsThomasTRT and I gave away a Super Deluxe Makerspace Starter Kit to a colleague. @DesignMakeTeach #lcpstrts helping TRTs. Maker space starter kit presentation. pic.twitter.com/51WKKErqMf — Joe Schwarz (@eLearnVL) January 11, 2017 Nichole and I hosted an Edcamp style session on makerspaces at the December meeting for Technology Resource Teachers (TRTs) in… Read more »

Mystery Artifact Lesson

What is this object? What does it do? What is its historical significance and value? You are professional appraiser brought in as an expert by shows such as Antiques Roadshow, American Pickers and Pawn Stars to determine the value of an unknown artifact. Your job is to research the object and give a 3 minute… Read more »

WIP 003: All About Sharing

Problem: How do students share their 3D designs with the world? I’m a 3D printing enthusiast in the world of education and believe me when I say I understand the challenges of classroom implementation. Design / Printing / Sharing How to have each student contribute? Screenshots, Tinkercad embeds, Sketchfab, video, renders. Edith Ackermann Tribute: FabLearn… Read more »